Allie Loves Absinthe

Allie. 23. F. Taken. Intellectual whore, knowledge deprived, and curious to the bones. Loves absinthe. I like girls and so what?

As I grow older, more people admitted to me that they’re not exclusively heterosexual. What’s the meaning of this?

Grey matter matters when measuring our tolerance of risk

neurosciencestuff:

There is a link between our brain structure and our tolerance of risk, new research suggests.

Dr Agnieszka Tymula, an economist at the University of Sydney, is one of the lead authors of a new study that identifies what might be considered the first stable ‘biomarker’ for financial…

(Source: sydney.edu.au)

WHEN I TRY TO EXPLAIN MY RESEARCH TO CIVILIANS

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

image

credit: epicshenanigansattheirfinest

neurosciencestuff:

Brain structure could predict risky behavior
Some people avoid risks at all costs, while others will put their wealth, health, and safety at risk without a thought. Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that the volume of the parietal cortex in the brain could predict where people fall on the risk-taking spectrum.
Led by Ifat Levy, assistant professor in comparative medicine and neurobiology at Yale School of Medicine, the team found that those with larger volume in a particular part of the parietal cortex were willing to take more risks than those with less volume in this part of the brain. The findings are published in the Sept. 10 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.
Although several cognitive and personality traits are reflected in brain structure, there has been little research linking brain structure to economic preferences. Levy and her colleagues sought to examine this question in their study.
Study participants included young adult men and women from the northeastern United States. Participants made a series of choices between monetary lotteries that varied in their degree of risk, and the research team conducted standard anatomical MRI brain scans. The results were first obtained in a group of 28 participants, and then confirmed in a second, independent, group of 33 participants.
“Based on our findings, we could, in principle, use millions of existing medical brains scans to assess risk attitudes in populations,” said Levy. “It could also help us explain differences in risk attitudes based in part on structural brain differences.”
Levy cautions that the results do not speak to causality. “We don’t know if structural changes lead to behavioral changes or vice-versa,” she said.
Levy and her team had previously shown that risk aversion increases as people age, and we scientists also know that the cortex thins substantially with age. “It could be that this thinning explains the behavioral changes; we are now testing that possibility,” said Levy, who also notes that more studies in wider populations are needed.

neurosciencestuff:

Brain structure could predict risky behavior

Some people avoid risks at all costs, while others will put their wealth, health, and safety at risk without a thought. Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that the volume of the parietal cortex in the brain could predict where people fall on the risk-taking spectrum.

Led by Ifat Levy, assistant professor in comparative medicine and neurobiology at Yale School of Medicine, the team found that those with larger volume in a particular part of the parietal cortex were willing to take more risks than those with less volume in this part of the brain. The findings are published in the Sept. 10 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

Although several cognitive and personality traits are reflected in brain structure, there has been little research linking brain structure to economic preferences. Levy and her colleagues sought to examine this question in their study.

Study participants included young adult men and women from the northeastern United States. Participants made a series of choices between monetary lotteries that varied in their degree of risk, and the research team conducted standard anatomical MRI brain scans. The results were first obtained in a group of 28 participants, and then confirmed in a second, independent, group of 33 participants.

“Based on our findings, we could, in principle, use millions of existing medical brains scans to assess risk attitudes in populations,” said Levy. “It could also help us explain differences in risk attitudes based in part on structural brain differences.”

Levy cautions that the results do not speak to causality. “We don’t know if structural changes lead to behavioral changes or vice-versa,” she said.

Levy and her team had previously shown that risk aversion increases as people age, and we scientists also know that the cortex thins substantially with age. “It could be that this thinning explains the behavioral changes; we are now testing that possibility,” said Levy, who also notes that more studies in wider populations are needed.

neurosciencestuff:

Status and the Brain
Social hierarchy is a fact of life for many animals. Navigating social hierarchy requires understanding one’s own status relative to others and behaving accordingly, while achieving higher status may call upon cunning and strategic thinking. The neural mechanisms mediating social status have become increasingly well understood in invertebrates and model organisms like fish and mice but until recently have remained more opaque in humans and other primates. In a new study in this issue, Noonan and colleagues explore the neural correlates of social rank in macaques. Using both structural and functional brain imaging, they found neural changes associated with individual monkeys’ social status, including alterations in the amygdala, hypothalamus, and brainstem—areas previously implicated in dominance-related behavior in other vertebrates. A separate but related network in the temporal and prefrontal cortex appears to mediate more cognitive aspects of strategic social behavior. These findings begin to delineate the neural circuits that enable us to navigate our own social worlds. A major remaining challenge is identifying how these networks contribute functionally to our social lives, which may open new avenues for developing innovative treatments for social disorders.
Full Article

neurosciencestuff:

Status and the Brain

Social hierarchy is a fact of life for many animals. Navigating social hierarchy requires understanding one’s own status relative to others and behaving accordingly, while achieving higher status may call upon cunning and strategic thinking. The neural mechanisms mediating social status have become increasingly well understood in invertebrates and model organisms like fish and mice but until recently have remained more opaque in humans and other primates. In a new study in this issue, Noonan and colleagues explore the neural correlates of social rank in macaques. Using both structural and functional brain imaging, they found neural changes associated with individual monkeys’ social status, including alterations in the amygdala, hypothalamus, and brainstem—areas previously implicated in dominance-related behavior in other vertebrates. A separate but related network in the temporal and prefrontal cortex appears to mediate more cognitive aspects of strategic social behavior. These findings begin to delineate the neural circuits that enable us to navigate our own social worlds. A major remaining challenge is identifying how these networks contribute functionally to our social lives, which may open new avenues for developing innovative treatments for social disorders.

Full Article

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Ethereal forms shift and swirl in photographer Thomas Herbich’s series “Smoke”. The cigarette smoke in the images is a buoyant plume. As it rises, the smoke is sheared and shaped by its passage through the ambient air. What begins as a laminar plume is quickly disturbed, rolling up into vortices shaped like the scroll on the end of a violin. The vortices are a precursor to the turbulence that follows, mixing the smoke and ambient air so effectively that the smoke diffuses into invisibility. To see the full series, see Herbich’s website.  (Image credits: T. Herbich; via Colossal; submitted by @jchawner@__pj, and Larry B)

P.S. - FYFD now has a page listing all entries by topic, which should make it easier for everyone to find specific topics of interest. Check it out!

(via sagansense)

la-rinascente:

Instead of leaking celebrity photos we could leak pdf versions of college textbooks? Idk just an idea

(via fluent-in-lesbianism)

mymodernmet:

Cambridgeshire-based artist Chris Wood's beautiful, geometric arrangements of colorful glass create dazzling reflections and projections of light.

(via mashable)

fashionsfromhistory:

Ritual Textile
18th Century

This textile is an excellent example of an object which has travelled in distance and time during its lifespan. At the same time it has acquired several new meanings. It was produced in Northwest India as a commodity for export to Indonesia in the 18th century. Among the To Kaili people in Central Sulawesi it was classified a “precious cloth”, not worn daily, but preserved as a family valuable and used as a ritual textile. Later on it was transferred to Finland and became part of the museum’s collection. Now this item´s biography refers to the great Indian textile tradition, trade between India and Indonesia, the religious and social life among the To Kaili people in Sulawesi and the Finnish missionary work in Indonesia.
This Indian textile was acquired by a Finnish Salvation Army officer, Edvard Rosenlund (1895–1939), in Bora, Central Sulawesi (Celebes), Indonesia in 1922– 1928. Rosenlund worked in Central Sulawesi 1919–1928 and collected about 500 objects, took photos, made a film and wrote several newspaper articles about the local culture. According to Rosenlund “The most antique piece of cloth that I have been able to get hold of there. It has formerly been the property of the powerful prince of Sigi. Nowadays it represents capital. At great festivals they hang up such antique pieces of cloth under which the priestesses perform their dances. The price of this piece was earlier 7 slaves and 7 buffaloes. Acquired at Bora. Provenance unknown.”

Suomen kansallismuseo via the VCM

fashionsfromhistory:

Ritual Textile

18th Century

This textile is an excellent example of an object which has travelled in distance and time during its lifespan. At the same time it has acquired several new meanings. It was produced in Northwest India as a commodity for export to Indonesia in the 18th century. Among the To Kaili people in Central Sulawesi it was classified a “precious cloth”, not worn daily, but preserved as a family valuable and used as a ritual textile. Later on it was transferred to Finland and became part of the museum’s collection. Now this item´s biography refers to the great Indian textile tradition, trade between India and Indonesia, the religious and social life among the To Kaili people in Sulawesi and the Finnish missionary work in Indonesia.

This Indian textile was acquired by a Finnish Salvation Army officer, Edvard Rosenlund (1895–1939), in Bora, Central Sulawesi (Celebes), Indonesia in 1922– 1928. Rosenlund worked in Central Sulawesi 1919–1928 and collected about 500 objects, took photos, made a film and wrote several newspaper articles about the local culture. According to Rosenlund “The most antique piece of cloth that I have been able to get hold of there. It has formerly been the property of the powerful prince of Sigi. Nowadays it represents capital. At great festivals they hang up such antique pieces of cloth under which the priestesses perform their dances. The price of this piece was earlier 7 slaves and 7 buffaloes. Acquired at Bora. Provenance unknown.”

Suomen kansallismuseo via the VCM

lesbicashot:

Melhor filme, pfvr.

lesbicashot:

Melhor filme, pfvr.

(Source: , via lezitup)

Better Identification of Viking Corpses Reveals: Half of the Warriors Were Female | Tor.com

juliedillon:

bisexualpiratequeen:

"Researchers at the University of Western Australia decided to revamp the way they studied Viking remains. Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. (Female remains were identified by their oval brooches, and not much else.) By studying osteological signs of gender within the bones themselves, researchers discovered that approximately half of the remains were actually female warriors, given a proper burial with their weapons.”

Women have always fought. We have always been there, ‘contributing to history’. Our own, modern sexism contributes to the erasure of it.

(Bolding mine)

"We have always been there, ‘contributing to history’. Our own, modern sexism contributes to the erasure of it."

(via fluent-in-lesbianism)

ri-science:

How to make a homemade lava lamp with some water, oil, food colouring and Alka-Seltzer tablets!

Lovely activity to explore floating, sinking and density with your children. Watch the full video and download the worksheet here.

(via shychemist)