Allie Loves Absinthe

Allie. 24. F. Taken. Intellectual whore, knowledge deprived, and curious to the bones. Loves absinthe. I like girls and so what?

creativehouses:

Colourful Markthal Rotterdam by MVRDV
Source: Matthijs Borghgraef a.k.a. Kwikzilver

creativehouses:

Colourful Markthal Rotterdam by MVRDV

Source: Matthijs Borghgraef a.k.a. Kwikzilver

When I am the only one on the team dieting

whatsmybusinesscase:

Cupcake Dog Has Flashbacks

neuromorphogenesis:

Brain baloney has no place in the classroom
If you want to make a neuroscientist’s head explode, all you need to do is confidently and triumphantly tell them that humans only use 10% of their brains. Or that right-brained people are more creative than left-brained people. Or that jiggling your head around gets more blood to the brain so you can think more efficiently. These are myths about the brain that have now been around for so long, it’s a wonder they haven’t had a congratulatory message from the Queen.
Unfortunately, because they’ve been around for so long, neuromyths have taken hold in a broad range of aspects of everyday life. Nowhere is this more problematic than in the education system. A new article in Nature Reviews Neuroscience this week has cast a critical eye on the issue, and reveals some worrying statistics about the extent to which brain baloney have infiltrated the beliefs of teachers around the world.
The survey, conducted by Paul Howard-Jones at the University of Bristol, asked 938 teachers from five different countries whether they agreed or not with a number of statements relating to popular myths about the brain. The results paint a picture of a global epidemic of neurononsense. In the UK, 91% of teachers surveyed believed that differences in hemispheric dominance could account for differences in preferred learning methods for students – in other words, ‘left-brained’ students think in a different way to ‘right-brained’ students. Among Chinese teachers, 59% agreed that we only use 10% of our brains. Across all five countries – the UK, the Netherlands, Turkey, Greece and China – on average, a whopping 96% of surveyed teachers agreed that students learn most effectively when taught in their preferred learning style (visual, auditory or kinaesthetic).
But why is this the case? Howard-Jones argues that there’s a number of reasons why neuromyths persist, but they essentially all boil down to inadequate communication between neuroscientists, educators and policymakers.
In particular, an ongoing issue is that neuroscientific counter-evidence to dodgy brain claims are difficult to access for non-specialists. Often, crucial information appears in quite a complex form in specialist neuroscientific journals, and often behind an exorbitant paywall – for example, the Journal of Neuroscience charges $30 for one day of access to a single article. And yes, ironically it’s worth noting that the neuromyths paper is, frustratingly, also behind a paywall.
Another problem is misinterpretation – particularly when it comes to neuroimaging studies. Without a proper grounding in how to interpret scans of the brain, images showing different areas ‘lighting up’ perpetuates a misconception that these areas are active but isolated from each other, with the rest of the brain inactive at that point in time. “To non specialists”, Howard-Jones argues in the paper, “apparently well-defined and static islands on one side of a brain are more suggested of a new phrenology than of a statistical map indicating where activity has exceeded an arbitrary threshold.”
And so we’re left with a situation in which neuromyths have largely been left unchallenged in the education system. But, at least there’s a spark of hope that this is changing. Both teachers and neuroscientists alike are starting to see an increased need for better communication. A new field of ‘educational neuroscience’ is starting to develop, in part bolstered by a 2011 report from the Royal Society looking at some of the implications of neuroscience within a teaching and learning setting. And teaching unions are eager to look at the possibilities for using neuroscience – they just need to be careful that they do so in an objective, evidence-based way.
Two things spring to mind that can be done immediately. Wouldn’t it be great if Nature Reviews Neuroscience dropped the paywall for this article, and sent it to as many teachers and schools as possible? Alternatively, let’s give teachers a core textbook of their own: Christian Jarrett’s excellent book Great Myths of the Brain, which came out this week. Required reading before thinking about neuroscience-based education policies. And yes, it will be on the exam at the end of the year.
By the way, if you want to make a psychologist’s head explode, all you need to do is ask them if they can tell what you’re thinking. Or ask them whether it’s a proper science. Just don’t mention anything about p values or replication.

neuromorphogenesis:

Brain baloney has no place in the classroom

If you want to make a neuroscientist’s head explode, all you need to do is confidently and triumphantly tell them that humans only use 10% of their brains. Or that right-brained people are more creative than left-brained people. Or that jiggling your head around gets more blood to the brain so you can think more efficiently. These are myths about the brain that have now been around for so long, it’s a wonder they haven’t had a congratulatory message from the Queen.

Unfortunately, because they’ve been around for so long, neuromyths have taken hold in a broad range of aspects of everyday life. Nowhere is this more problematic than in the education system. A new article in Nature Reviews Neuroscience this week has cast a critical eye on the issue, and reveals some worrying statistics about the extent to which brain baloney have infiltrated the beliefs of teachers around the world.

The survey, conducted by Paul Howard-Jones at the University of Bristol, asked 938 teachers from five different countries whether they agreed or not with a number of statements relating to popular myths about the brain. The results paint a picture of a global epidemic of neurononsense. In the UK, 91% of teachers surveyed believed that differences in hemispheric dominance could account for differences in preferred learning methods for students – in other words, ‘left-brained’ students think in a different way to ‘right-brained’ students. Among Chinese teachers, 59% agreed that we only use 10% of our brains. Across all five countries – the UK, the Netherlands, Turkey, Greece and China – on average, a whopping 96% of surveyed teachers agreed that students learn most effectively when taught in their preferred learning style (visual, auditory or kinaesthetic).

But why is this the case? Howard-Jones argues that there’s a number of reasons why neuromyths persist, but they essentially all boil down to inadequate communication between neuroscientists, educators and policymakers.

In particular, an ongoing issue is that neuroscientific counter-evidence to dodgy brain claims are difficult to access for non-specialists. Often, crucial information appears in quite a complex form in specialist neuroscientific journals, and often behind an exorbitant paywall – for example, the Journal of Neuroscience charges $30 for one day of access to a single article. And yes, ironically it’s worth noting that the neuromyths paper is, frustratingly, also behind a paywall.

Another problem is misinterpretation – particularly when it comes to neuroimaging studies. Without a proper grounding in how to interpret scans of the brain, images showing different areas ‘lighting up’ perpetuates a misconception that these areas are active but isolated from each other, with the rest of the brain inactive at that point in time. “To non specialists”, Howard-Jones argues in the paper, “apparently well-defined and static islands on one side of a brain are more suggested of a new phrenology than of a statistical map indicating where activity has exceeded an arbitrary threshold.”

And so we’re left with a situation in which neuromyths have largely been left unchallenged in the education system. But, at least there’s a spark of hope that this is changing. Both teachers and neuroscientists alike are starting to see an increased need for better communication. A new field of ‘educational neuroscience’ is starting to develop, in part bolstered by a 2011 report from the Royal Society looking at some of the implications of neuroscience within a teaching and learning setting. And teaching unions are eager to look at the possibilities for using neuroscience – they just need to be careful that they do so in an objective, evidence-based way.

Two things spring to mind that can be done immediately. Wouldn’t it be great if Nature Reviews Neuroscience dropped the paywall for this article, and sent it to as many teachers and schools as possible? Alternatively, let’s give teachers a core textbook of their own: Christian Jarrett’s excellent book Great Myths of the Brain, which came out this week. Required reading before thinking about neuroscience-based education policies. And yes, it will be on the exam at the end of the year.

By the way, if you want to make a psychologist’s head explode, all you need to do is ask them if they can tell what you’re thinking. Or ask them whether it’s a proper science. Just don’t mention anything about p values or replication.

slxvery:

click here for a SKATE/URBAN blog.
futurist-foresight:

girl-havoced:

I believe in free education, one that’s available to everyone; no matter their race, gender, age, wealth, etc… This masterpost was created for every knowledge hungry individual out there. I hope it will serve you well. Enjoy!
FREE ONLINE COURSES (here are listed websites that provide huge variety of courses)
Alison 
Coursera
FutureLearn
open2study
Khan Academy
edX
P2P U
Academic Earth
iversity
Stanford Online
MIT Open Courseware
Open Yale Courses
BBC Learning
OpenLearn
Carnegie Mellon University OLI
University of Reddit
Saylor
IDEAS, INSPIRATION & NEWS (websites which deliver educational content meant to entertain you and stimulate your brain)
TED
FORA
Big Think  
99u
BBC Future
Seriously Amazing
How Stuff Works
Discovery News
National Geographic
Science News
Popular Science
IFLScience
YouTube Edu
DIY & HOW-TO’S (Don’t know how to do that? Want to learn how to do it yourself? Here are some great websites.)
wikiHow
Wonder How To
instructables
eHow
Howcast
MAKE
Do it yourself
FREE TEXTBOOKS & E-BOOKS
OpenStax CNX
Open Textbooks
Bookboon
Textbook Revolution
E-books Directory
FullBooks
Books Should Be Free
Classic Reader
Read Print
Project Gutenberg
AudioBooks For Free
LibriVox
Poem Hunter
Bartleby
MIT Classics
Many Books
Open Textbooks BCcampus
Open Textbook Library
WikiBooks
SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES & JOURNALS
Directory of Open Access Journals
Scitable
PLOS
Wiley Open Access
Springer Open
Oxford Open
Elsevier Open Access
ArXiv
Open Access Library
LEARN:
1. LANGUAGES
Duolingo
BBC Languages
Learn A Language
101languages
Memrise
Livemocha
Foreign Services Institute
My Languages
Surface Languages
Lingualia
OmniGlot
OpenCulture’s Language links
2. COMPUTER SCIENCE & PROGRAMMING
Codecademy
Programmr
GA Dash
CodeHS
w3schools
Code Avengers
Codelearn
The Code Player
Code School
Code.org
Programming Motherf*?$%#
Bento
Bucky’s room
WiBit
Learn Code the Hard Way
Mozilla Developer Network
Microsoft Virtual Academy
3. YOGA & MEDITATION
Learning Yoga
Learn Meditation
Yome
Free Meditation
Online Meditation
Do Yoga With Me
Yoga Learning Center
4. PHOTOGRAPHY & FILMMAKING
Exposure Guide
The Bastards Book of Photography
Cambridge in Color
Best Photo Lessons
Photography Course
Production Now
nyvs
Learn About Film
Film School Online
5. DRAWING & PAINTING
Enliighten
Ctrl+Paint
ArtGraphica
Google Cultural Institute
Drawspace
DragoArt
WetCanvas
6. INSTRUMENTS & MUSIC THEORY
Music Theory
Teoria
Music Theory Videos
Furmanczyk Academy of Music
Dave Conservatoire
Petrucci Music Library
Justin Guitar
Guitar Lessons
Piano Lessons
Zebra Keys
Play Bass Now
7. OTHER UNCATEGORIZED SKILLS
Investopedia
The Chess Website
Chesscademy
Chess.com
Spreeder
ReadSpeeder
First Aid for Free
First Aid Web
Wolfram Demonstrations Project
Please feel free to add more learning focused websites. 
*There are a lot more learning websites out there, but I picked the ones that are, as far as I’m aware, completely free and in my opinion the best/ more useful.

A very interesting collection of links to add to your toolkit

futurist-foresight:

girl-havoced:

I believe in free education, one that’s available to everyone; no matter their race, gender, age, wealth, etc… This masterpost was created for every knowledge hungry individual out there. I hope it will serve you well. Enjoy!

FREE ONLINE COURSES (here are listed websites that provide huge variety of courses)

IDEAS, INSPIRATION & NEWS (websites which deliver educational content meant to entertain you and stimulate your brain)

DIY & HOW-TO’S (Don’t know how to do that? Want to learn how to do it yourself? Here are some great websites.)

FREE TEXTBOOKS & E-BOOKS

SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES & JOURNALS

LEARN:

1. LANGUAGES

2. COMPUTER SCIENCE & PROGRAMMING

3. YOGA & MEDITATION

4. PHOTOGRAPHY & FILMMAKING

5. DRAWING & PAINTING

6. INSTRUMENTS & MUSIC THEORY

7. OTHER UNCATEGORIZED SKILLS

Please feel free to add more learning focused websites. 

*There are a lot more learning websites out there, but I picked the ones that are, as far as I’m aware, completely free and in my opinion the best/ more useful.

A very interesting collection of links to add to your toolkit

Unwanted Questions

Should I just give up and dissolve into nothingness? Am I allowed to be selfish and stop giving a fuck?

Can I just disappear into non-existence? I think I’d like that. Can I just erase memories of me out of people’s minds?

Do you mind to forget that I’ve ever been in your life? Do you mind if I vanish just before your eyes?

I just want to go on adventures and never come back. To get lost in the wilderness and just be gone.

(Source: cruelings, via wewere-sobeautiful)

ourtimeorg:

We asked an advocate from the fairpaycampaign. | attn: Should You Boycott Unpaid Internships? 
strangelybeautifulworld:

nympherret:

like how much more obvious does this need to be made for people to get it?

this isnt even an exaggeration 
like at all

strangelybeautifulworld:

nympherret:

like how much more obvious does this need to be made for people to get it?

this isnt even an exaggeration 

like at all

(Source: america-wakiewakie, via theintellectualbadassgirl)

ourtimeorg:

A shift in attitudes? | attn: We Asked 2000 People What They Thought About Unpaid Internships
mindblowingscience:

Smoking a Joint Won’t Make You More Creative: Study

A great number of recreational cannabis proponents believe that lighting up can “open the mind” and even boost creativity. However, a new study has found evidence that shows just the opposite may occur.
That’s at least according to the researchers behind a new study published in the journal Psychoparmacology.
"The improved creativity that they believe they experience is an illusion," researcher Lorenza Colzato, who authored the study, said in a recent release.
"If you want to overcome writer’s block or any other creative gap, lighting up a joint isn’t the best solution," he added. "Smoking several joints one after the other can even be counterproductive to creative thinking."
Colzato and his colleague Mikael Kowal at Leiden University recently determined this after assessing 59 healthy participants who regularly use cannabis for recreational means.
These study participants were divided into three groups of 18 and were given either high concentration Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) - the recreational ingredient in cannabis - low concentration THC (about the equivalent of one joint), or a placebo via vaporizer.
All the participants were then required to complete a series of cognitive tasks that were designed to measure two forms of thinking.
Tasks like, “think of as many uses as you can for a pen,” were assigned to measure what is called divergent thinking (varied/creative); while determining the correct answer to a question such as “what is the link between the words ‘time’, ‘hair’ and ‘stretching’?” (answer: long) was used to measure convergent (standardized) thinking.
Interestingly, the participants fared significantly worse in their divergent thinking tasks with the more THC they were given. Likewise, those participants that were given a single joint’s worth of THC proved no better at creative tasks than the sober placebo group.
The researchers are quick to point out that the study is certainly too small to say with certainty that THC can inhabit creative thinking, nor can it explain how. However, there was also a clear lack of creativity improvement among the high participants, implying that the “open mind” of cannabis use is just an illusion.

mindblowingscience:

Smoking a Joint Won’t Make You More Creative: Study

A great number of recreational cannabis proponents believe that lighting up can “open the mind” and even boost creativity. However, a new study has found evidence that shows just the opposite may occur.

That’s at least according to the researchers behind a new study published in the journal Psychoparmacology.

"The improved creativity that they believe they experience is an illusion," researcher Lorenza Colzato, who authored the study, said in a recent release.

"If you want to overcome writer’s block or any other creative gap, lighting up a joint isn’t the best solution," he added. "Smoking several joints one after the other can even be counterproductive to creative thinking."

Colzato and his colleague Mikael Kowal at Leiden University recently determined this after assessing 59 healthy participants who regularly use cannabis for recreational means.

These study participants were divided into three groups of 18 and were given either high concentration Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) - the recreational ingredient in cannabis - low concentration THC (about the equivalent of one joint), or a placebo via vaporizer.

All the participants were then required to complete a series of cognitive tasks that were designed to measure two forms of thinking.

Tasks like, “think of as many uses as you can for a pen,” were assigned to measure what is called divergent thinking (varied/creative); while determining the correct answer to a question such as “what is the link between the words ‘time’, ‘hair’ and ‘stretching’?” (answer: long) was used to measure convergent (standardized) thinking.

Interestingly, the participants fared significantly worse in their divergent thinking tasks with the more THC they were given. Likewise, those participants that were given a single joint’s worth of THC proved no better at creative tasks than the sober placebo group.

The researchers are quick to point out that the study is certainly too small to say with certainty that THC can inhabit creative thinking, nor can it explain how. However, there was also a clear lack of creativity improvement among the high participants, implying that the “open mind” of cannabis use is just an illusion.

leeluhhlush:

cyberrghetto:

likefireandice:

supah-mayne:

fuckyeahdiomedes:

2gay2exist:

yaruspook:

isimonito:

gorogoroiu:

honkschraders:

metal-thimble:

geekscoutcookies:

luvyourselfsomeesteem:

tidiness:

after reblogging this i opened up a card my great aunt gave me it has money in it

It could be a complete coincidence but I reblogged this yesterday and toda I fouund $40 at the fruit maket

Eh,why not

#this is dumb#but i’m desperate

when you got nothing you got nothing to lose

I got a job after reblogging this !

I GOT 40$

I GOT $1360! <3<3

ayyyyee

I got a job after the last time i reblogged this, so what the hell, maybe it works

I got a job too omg

dont judge me for reblogging this ok.

lmao


Everyone wants money

leeluhhlush:

cyberrghetto:

likefireandice:

supah-mayne:

fuckyeahdiomedes:

2gay2exist:

yaruspook:

isimonito:

gorogoroiu:

honkschraders:

metal-thimble:

geekscoutcookies:

luvyourselfsomeesteem:

tidiness:

after reblogging this i opened up a card my great aunt gave me it has money in it

It could be a complete coincidence but I reblogged this yesterday and toda I fouund $40 at the fruit maket

Eh,why not

when you got nothing you got nothing to lose

I got a job after reblogging this !

I GOT 40$

I GOT $1360! <3<3

ayyyyee

I got a job after the last time i reblogged this, so what the hell, maybe it works

I got a job too omg

dont judge me for reblogging this ok.

lmao

Everyone wants money

(Source: scarybilbo, via shadesandgoldbullets)